mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene
mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene
mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene
mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene
mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene
mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene
mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene
mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene
mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene

mydollyaviana:

My favourite concept art by Lisa Keene

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - FOLDS

More on folds today. I will eventually cover all types of folds but today is about simple folds on everyday clothes (t-shirt, jeans). The key is to know what to expect and then applying what you know to simplify what you see in front of you (when life drawing). A lot of the folds dynamics on shirts and jeans come from the “memory” of the fabric itself. Denim is thick and is likely to keep some form of wrinkles or folds around certain areas (knees). A lot of zig-zag patterns around the knee is very likely. When pushed down on the feet, the denim fabric will bunch up and combine with the zig-zag pattern. Shirts and t-shirts will react to the twist and pull of the arms and torso. Identify where the pull (or tension) is coming from and work from it. I tend to draw the seams because they clearly express the volumes underneath.

Norm

kickingshoes:

eyecaging:

Kitajami Gifs

THIS IS SO HELPFUL

(Source: tsisenman)

asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.
asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.
asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.
asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.
asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.
asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.
asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.
asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.
asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.
asylum-art:

 Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic 
Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.

asylum-art:

Erin Hanson transforms desert landscape into an abstract mosaic

Hanging precariously and horizontally from red sandstone, fifty feet above the ground, may not seem like it would inspire the creation of beautiful oil paintings, but that is exactly what happened with Erin Hanson. After a lifetime of experimenting in different styles and mediums, it wasn’t until Hanson moved to the outskirts of Las Vegas to climb at Red Rock Canyon that her painting style was consolidated by a single inspiration and force of nature.

(Source: f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s)

What makes a hero?

(Source: youtube.com)

the-disney-elite:

"The [character] that I was able to crawl into the most was Lilo from Lilo & Stitch. This was sort of a cartoony-looking girl, but her problems were completely real. Her funky world that she created…I mean, you know kids like that. It was very honest and genuine and I wanted to do an honest job, so I thought about the character a lot before I animated it. I really got into the character, where [I] almost felt that pain that she had. The loss of the parents — you need to feel all that. That was a big learning experience for me.”
— Andreas Deja on animating Lilo from Lilo & Stitch (2002).
GIF: Andreas Deja’s pencil animation for Lilo. (x)

the-disney-elite:

"The [character] that I was able to crawl into the most was Lilo from Lilo & Stitch. This was sort of a cartoony-looking girl, but her problems were completely real. Her funky world that she created…I mean, you know kids like that. It was very honest and genuine and I wanted to do an honest job, so I thought about the character a lot before I animated it. I really got into the character, where [I] almost felt that pain that she had. The loss of the parents — you need to feel all that. That was a big learning experience for me.”

— Andreas Deja on animating Lilo from Lilo & Stitch (2002).

GIF: Andreas Deja’s pencil animation for Lilo. (x)

(Source: andreasdeja.blogspot.com)